Picture: Ungoogleable questioning and interaction at Stephanie Cerda's school by Ewan McIntosh. Sourced from Flickr and reproduced under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0) licence.

A listing of key texts.

The idea of open schooling gained some currency in the early 1970s. In this vision, the school was to open up its processes and to to become more permeable. Here I have picked out some texts overtly centred on open schooling.

Easthope, G. (1975) Community, Hierarchy and Open Education, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul. 137 + xiv pages. Chapters are arranged in sections according the three notions in the title. The two chapters in the open education section discuss Basil Bernstein’s thinking in relation to the subject; and the nature of the open school (organisation best characterised as a process rather than a structure).

Nyberg, D. (ed.) (1975) The Philosophy of Open Education, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul. 213 + xiii pages. Useful collection that examines problems of definition (what is ‘open’ about open education; open to what etc.?); problems of knowledge; problems of socialization; and problems of freedom.

Puckrose, H. (1975) Open School, Open Society, London: Evans. 101 + x pages. This very readable book examines the rather confusing notion of the open school. He argues that such a school should meet the needs of, and serve local society, be aware of its attitudes, and be able to link them to school life and work as the need arises. He has chapter on the open child; open learning; open curriculum; open classroom; and open teacher. He also looks at the school being open to pre-school children and to adults.

Sharp, J. (1973) Open School. The experience of 1964-70 at Wyndham School, Egremont, Cumberland, London: Dent. 132 + x pages. Sharp was head of the school – which was purpose-built for a House system. He argues that the staff were able to create a comprehensive school that was open, informal and homely. It was both a school and further education centre, and included an open library, youth centre, swimming pool and playing fields. Discusses some of the issues around ‘flexibility’ and democracy in schooling.

Acknowledgement: Picture: Ungoogleable questioning and interaction at Stephanie Cerda’s school by Ewan McIntosh. Sourced from Flickr and reproduced under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0) licence. http://www.flickr.com/photos/91712888@N00/8683257942/

© Mark K. Smith. First published July 1996.

How to cite this piece: Smith, M. K. (1996). ‘Open schooling’, the encyclopaedia of informal education. [http://infed.org/mobi/open-schooling/ . Retrieved: insert date].

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