Jane Addams and informal education

Jane Addams painted by George de Forest Brush, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.  Sourced from Wikimedia - listed as being in the public domain.

Jane Addams and informal education. Well known for her work at Hull House, Addams made a seminal contribution to the development of settlement houses and social work in north America.

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Jane Addams (1869-1935) is, perhaps, best known as a pioneering social worker and social activist, however she was also a committed internationalist and critical intellectual. She introduced and developed the idea of the settlement house to the United States (founding Hull House with Ellen Starr in 1889); campaigned for better social conditions and led investigations into various areas of health and welfare. Jane Addams saw education as the foundation for democracy. She also argued for women’s suffrage and for the peaceful resolution of international conflicts. Her pacifism led her to oppose US entry into the First World War. After the cessation of hostilities she was active in organizing relief supplies. Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931, Jane Addams died in 1935.

Note: The full text of Twenty Years at Hull House is available on the Celebration of Women Writers site: Twenty Years at Hull-House with Autobiographical Notes

Acknowledgement: Jane Addams painted by George de Forest Brush, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. Sourced from Wikimedia – listed as being in the public domain.

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