The picture of bell hooks was sourced from Wikimedia Commons and is believed to be in the public domain (Cmongirl): Bellhooks.jpg

Exploring thinkers central to the development of the theory and practice of lifelong learning, social action, social pedagogy and informal education

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bell hooks on education. Barry Burke assesses the contribution that bell hooks has made to thinking about education and sets this within the context of her biography and work.

Sissela Bok on lying and moral choice in private and public life – an amplification. Robert K. Fullinwider explores and amplifies Sissela Bok’s seminal work: Lying: Moral Choice in Private and Public Life (1978). Lying remains in print today, nearly thirty years after its initial publication, and is widely used in the classroom. Its continuing broad readership pays tribute to the book’s lucidity and good sense. Bok’s work has no peer as a serious treatment of a central, but neglected, dimension of moral life.

John Ruskin on education. John Ruskin altered the way we look at art and architecture, and was an influential social critic and advocate of economic change and reform. His desire to advance reform and to deepen people’s appreciation of art inevitably brought him to teaching and to education. His work was to have lasting significance. But what did Ruskin advocate? What was special about his approach? Sara E. Atwood explores his contribution.

Richard Henry Tawney, fellowship and adult education. R. H. Tawney was a noted economic historian, democratic socialist and educator. Here we make a brief assessment of his contribution as an adult educationalist – and his strong belief in fellowship.

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Acknowledgement: The picture of bell hooks was sourced from Wikimedia Commons and is believed to be in the public domain (Cmongirl): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bellhooks.jpg